Comics Laureate Recommended Reading List


Covering a wide range of genres from science fiction and fantasy to crime and horror our recommended reading list by Stephen L. Holland, our Comics Laureate 2021-2023, has something for everyone!

Explore the recommended reading list below by Stephen L. Holland... and check out the downloadable reviews at the bottom of the page!

Introduction by Stephen L. Holland, Comics Laureate 2021-2023

This is an introduction. No actually, it is. It’s an introduction to comics.

One of my primary goals as Comics Laureate is to introduce as many new people as possible from the broadest of backgrounds to the most diverse range of quality graphic novels currently available in Britain.

To reach new people accessibility is all, so this isn’t a guide to the cleverest comics ever created (although they are all exceptionally clever); it’s a selection of the very finest and most beguiling which have proved to be perfect introductions to those curious about comics during my 25+ years as curator of Page 45, so often kick-starting a lifetime’s newfound adoration and exploration of our beloved medium.

I’ll be adding to them during my two-year tenure when new gems emerge, as some of my favourites like Alessandro Sanna’s THE RIVER are brought back into print, and once what’s already here has already been digested. Overwhelming anyone is counter-productive, so initially I’ve pruned hard, but please do pop back from time to time!

Check out the list so far...

// Contemporary Fiction

A Distant Neighbourhood by Jiro Taniguchi

Biscuits (Assorted) by Jenny Robins

Daytripper by Fábio Moon, Gabriel Bá

I Love This Part by Tillie Walden

In: A Graphic Novel by Will McPhail

Kingdom by John McNaught

Nelson by Rob Davis, Woodrow Phoenix and 52 stellar creators

Tamara Drewe by Posy Simmonds MBE

The Arrival by Shaun Tan

The Nao of Brown by Glyn Dillon

The Park Bench by Chabouté

The Sculptor by Scott McCloud

The Tale Of One Bad Rat by Bryan Talbot

Wet Moon by Sophie Campbell

// Crime

Fatale by Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips

Velvet by Ed Brubaker & Steve Epting with Elizabeth Breitwesier

// Comedy

Asterios Polyp by David Mazzucchelli

Dragman by Steven Appleby

Fluffy by Simone Lia

Livestock by Hannah Berry (Comics Laureate 2019-2021)

Seconds by Bryan Lee O’Malley

// Science Fiction

Lazarus by Greg Rucka & Michael Lark

// Horror

From Hell by Alan Moore & Eddie Campbell

Rachel Rising by Terry Moore

// Fantasy

Die by Kieron Gillen & Stephanie Hans

Sandman by Neil Gaiman

The Encyclopedia of Early Earth by Isabel Greenberg

// Non-Fiction

Pyongyang by Guy Delisle

The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui

The Roles We Play by Sabba Khan

// Young Adult

Bloom by Kevin Panetta & Savanna Ganucheau

Delicates by Brenna Thummler

Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up With Me by Mariko Tamaki & Rosemary Valero-O'Connell

This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki & Jillian Tamaki

What We Don’t Talk About by Charlot Kristensen

// Intermediate

Amulet by Kazu Kibuishi

Bad Machinery by John Allison

Kerry And The Knight Of The Forest by Andi Watson

Looshkin by Jamie Smart

Lumberjanes originally by Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis & Brooke A. Allen

Tom’s Midnight Garden by Philippa Pearce & Edith

// Younger Readers

The New Neighbours by Sarah McIntyre

The Pirate Tree by Brigita Orel & Jennie Poh



Download the reviews by Comics Laureate Stephen L. Holland below...


Stephen L. Holland, Comics Laureate 2021-2023


A few additional brief notes from Stephen L. Holland...

Every book I’ll include in Young Adult, Intermediate and even Young Readers is a work which has resonated with adults alike. YOU’RE SAFE WITH ME, HILDA and BAD MACHINERY, for example, have all been bought as much by adults for adults because of their craft. BAD MACHINERY’s readership at Page 45 is 95% adult because you won’t find more astute, sophisticated or funnier behavioural observation anywhere else in comics. You really won’t! I only place the series in Intermediate because it’s also perfectly age-appropriate, so that families and schools can snap them up too.

Additionally, a key element to any illustrated picture book should be to keep the adults reading them to their young loved ones entertained throughout the multiple, insatiable demands upon their poor, tired souls to read and re-read them yet again! An adult’s enthusiasm when reading out loud is infectious. Sarah McIntyre and John Klassen have in their works so many winks to offer an adult reader which will go over a youngster’s head. How much wiser and funnier do A.A. Milne’s words sound now to my adult sensibilities!

As to LAURA DEAN KEEPS BREAKING UP WITH ME and indeed BLOOM, I wish I’d read both of those aged 15 even if I’d been straight – they’re 100% universal with no mention of sex, so into Young Adults they go!

Lastly, just as I haven’t separated works from Britain, America, France or indeed Bratislava, so you’ll find no category for manga because it’s not a genre. It denotes no more than a geographical point of origin (Japan). Too long has manga been seen as factional, as “other”. Instead universally appealing works by the likes of the great Jiro Taniguchi have been folded into mainstream contemporary fiction, where they truly belong.

Okay, that’s enough about me and my opinionated attitude. Why don’t we let these great graphic novels speak for themselves?

All reviews have been written by me because it’s easier to keep tabs on copyright breaches.

Grrrr.

Stephen L. Holland, January 2021